The problems that only exist inside your head are the easiest to solve because they don't require any external work at all, just thinking. But they are also the hardest to solve because their solutions might imply giving up some of what you consider to be your identity and your lifestyle.
It's up to you to decide.
Recent studies display that wishful thinking starts in 13,7 seconds (on average) after the wish itself comes to mind. It means that everything you want distorts your perception and puts a bias on your worldview. Stronger desire makes a stronger distortion. Complex wish produces a complex bias. Highly abstract hope spawns a highly unpredictable delusion.
When being hungry you feel the taste differently from when you're full, despite that food itself is identical. If you dream of political changes, your assessment of a progressive politician's
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If you find yourself convincing a random stranger with no skin in your game that your particular decision is right, then it's likely that your decision is shit. Or so you are.
For a close analog of the random stranger, such as an ex-colleague or distant relative, this argument stands as well.
There are three kinds of users: those who read the manuals, those who don't read the manuals and those who read the manuals and then still do weird shit.
Building software that suits the needs of one group is hard. Building software that fits all of them is logically impossible.
There is the objective reality.
There are subjective opinions that we have about the objective reality.
There are zealots. Facing a contradiction between the reality and an opinion, they have to choose the latter, or otherwise they will eventually stop being zealots.
There are airplane pilots. Facing a contradiction between the reality and an opinion, they have to choose the former, or otherwise they will eventually die (and likely kill some innocent people too).
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